What is your child’s Emotional Intelligence (EQ) score?  They say that measuring emotional intelligence is subjective. Yet today we are providing parents and teachers with the information they need to determine how their children fair in the emotional domain.  Let’s take a quick survey and score your children with points for their ability to manage their emotions and relate appropriately.

What Is Your Child’s EQ Score?
Ages 3 to 6
               Read the 7 statements below and give your child a score.

Score: 1 = Good

2= Fair

3 = Needs Improvement

Please remember that young children need coaching.  The score is dependent upon their willingness to be present and listen to your direction.

1 Does your child offer kindness when one of his peers is upset?  
2 Is your child’s language and attitude filled with positive thoughts?  
3 Does your child like to help or does he/she prefer meeting his own needs?  
4 Can your child become calm after an upset without prolonged attention?  
5 When your child is angry and lashes out, can he/she say they are sorry?  
6 Just you child seek support from someone when he/she becomes frustrated or sad?  
7 Does your child remember to say thank you when someone has helped him/her?  

Each statement above is related to one of the 7 attributes of emotional intelligence. They are in order:  empathy, self-confidence, delay of gratification, managing emotions, reducing stress with accountability, sustaining hope through relationships, and persisting with frustration by seeing the glass half full.  Your child’s score is only an indication of the areas that need developing and enhancing.  Please go to my website to learn more about how to help your children develop these skills.    http://eqforchildren.com/

Starting 2018 with a fresh start and a renewed commitment to your child’s emotional well-being is an important stepping stone in giving your children the skills they need to become emotionally healthy and successful in all they choose to do.

Happy New Year!  Karen Stone

http://eqforchildren.com/teach-children-keep-hope-alive/